I am looking for driven, enthusiastic graduate students (MSc or PhD) interested in studying the ecological significance of animal personalities using Brook Trout and Sea Lamprey as model systems.
One opportunity will involve lab and field studies testing hypotheses about how individual differences in behaviour, and plastic responses to water flow, affect vulnerability to trapping in invasive sea lamprey. Invasive species are a major cause of biodiversity change. Trapping can be a valuable tool for the control and eradication if trapping success is high.
Another opportunity will involve lab and field studies testing hypotheses about the role that personality has in the processes promoting resource polymorphisms in Brook Trout. Resource polymorphisms are an interesting form of within species biodiversity that can help us understand the evolution of new species.

Successful candidates will join an energetic, interdisciplinary lab examining broad issues important to fish behaviour, ecology, and management. There will be opportunities to work with colleagues from other universities and management agencies.

Ideal candidates will have:

     – an undergraduate degree (MSc degree if applying for a PhD) in behavioural ecology, ecology, zoology, or a related discipline;

     – a valid driver’s license;

     – excellent writing and oral communication skills;

     – experience with and aptitude for quantitative analysis and experimental design.

Prior experience with lab or field research, especially in aquatic systems, would be a valuable asset.

Interested candidates are encouraged to email me a statement of their research interests, their CV, the names and contact information for at least two references, a copy of their transcripts (unofficial is fine), and an example of their best writing.

Rob McLaughlin ([email protected])