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Karen Murchie

KAREN MURCHIE Chair of the Larkin Award – since 2010   Occupation: Assistant Professor, Department of Biology, College of The Bahamas, Freeport, Grand Bahama, The Bahamas Expertise: My research interests are focused around the biology and ecophysiology of marine and freshwater fishes at both the basic and applied level. In particular I’m interested in energy dynamics at various ecological levels, the spatial ecology of individuals, and stress physiology in response to human activities and environmental changes. My aim is to undertake a research and conservation approach that embraces the complexity of our environment and the human dimension to further understand fisheries. Credentials and Affiliations: Ph.D. in Biology, Carleton University, 2010; M.Sc. in Biology, […]

Last January, all rivers led to Rome

“This week, all rivers lead to Rome,” said Mr. Arni Mathiesen, Assistant Director-General, FAO Fisheries and Aquaculture Department, in his opening remarks of the Global conference on Inland Fisheries. Last month in Rome the first global conference on inland fisheries was held . The role of inland fisheries is significant, yet underestimated on a global scale. For the first time scientists, policy makers and international development community gathered together to discuss and address the economic and ecological challenges related to freshwater fisheries around the globe, with a common goal to raise the profile of inland fisheries. The conference was organized into four themes (each with its own panel): Biological Assessment, Economic […]

Global warming to drive fish toward poles, according to a UBC study

A study from University of British Columbia published in ICES Journal of Marine Science concludes that global warming will drive fish toward poles, leading to potential disappearance of large number of fish from the tropics by 2050. While food security issues may arise in tropical countries, many of which rely heavily on fish as main source of protein, fish movement to the poles may generate opportunities for fisheries in the Arctic. This study follows on a previous research from UBC published in Nature in May 2013. More details on CBC website.